Sunday, August 21, 2016

ECT Workshop: Solutions to Fear!

The Vulnerable Children's Ministry and
Bethany Christian Services


Presents

An Empowered to Connect Workshop!


Join us all year long for Empowered to Connect workshops, every 4th Wednesday of the month! 
 
These workshops are video-driven, and facilitated by Alison Lamsma, MA, LSW from Bethany Christian Services.


Solutions to Fear: Tragically, children who have been harmed,neglected, and/or abused are at significantly increased risk for behavioral disorders, relationship failures, and early onset mental illness.  Developmental psychologist and former director of the TCU Institute of Child Development, Dr. Karyn Purvis, explains concepts to help caregivers and parents understand a child's brain chemistry and how neurotransmitter testing can be used to enhance therapeutic approaches.
 
Wednesday, August 24th
7:30pm - 8:45pm
Willow Creek Community Church, Room: 206
67 E. Algonquin Road, So. Barrington, IL 60010


***Training Credit Hours are offered for licensed foster parents.

Questions?  E-mail vulnerablechildren@willowcreek.org

Childcare for infants through pre-K is available, and Awana is available for Kindergarten through Grade 5 at Midweek for Kids.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Launching & Leading an Orphan Care Ministry in Your Church





Three Principles to Consider; Common Pitfalls to Avoid When Launching and Leading an Orphan Care Ministry in Your Church


The goal of your ministry is sustainability, not speed. It's not necessarily to do many things as much as it's about doing the right things. The needs of vulnerable children and families are overwhelming and the opportunities to engage are endless. However, as a leader, how do we prioritize the key objectives of our ministry? How do we build in safeguards that keep us focused on first things first? How do we learn the art of saying "no" sometimes and not "yes" all the time? 

This presentation will highlight three key principles all leaders must consider, and common pitfalls to avoid, when not only starting a new ministry but also leading and expanding an existing one. It will center around practical tools, real-life models and implementable "next steps" for you and/or your leadership team.


Presenters: 

Jason Johnson, CAFO's National Director of Church Ministry Initiatives
Kari StewartMissions and Orphan Ministry Director, Timberline Church & Northern Colorado Christian Alliance for Orphans

Wednesday, August 31
2pm (Eastern)

Register Here
FREE E-BOOK
As an added bonus, everyone who registers for this webinar will receive a FREE download of,
"Three Principles to Consider and Common Pitfalls to Avoid When Launching and Leading an Orphan Care Ministry in Your Church"! This new, engaging e-book will provide you with a tangible resource to continue processing through and applying the ideas that were discussed in this webinar. 

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Workshop: Solutions to Fear!



The Vulnerable Children's Ministry and
Bethany Christian Services


Presents

An Empowered to Connect Workshop!


Join us all year long for Empowered to Connect workshops, every 4th Wednesday of the month! 
 
These workshops are video-driven, and facilitated by Alison Lamsma, MA, LSW from Bethany Christian Services.


Solutions to Fear: Tragically, children who have been harmed,neglected, and/or abused are at significantly increased risk for behavioral disorders, relationship failures, and early onset mental illness.  Developmental psychologist and former director of the TCU Institute of Child Development, Dr. Karyn Purvis, explains concepts to help caregivers and parents understand a child's brain chemistry and how neurotransmitter testing can be used to enhance therapeutic approaches.
 
Wednesday, August 24th
7:30pm - 8:45pm
Willow Creek Community Church, Room: 206
67 E. Algonquin Road, So. Barrington, IL 60010


***Training Credit Hours are offered for licensed foster parents.

Questions?  E-mail vulnerablechildren@willowcreek.org

Childcare for infants through pre-K is available, and Awana is available for Kindergarten through Grade 5 at Midweek for Kids.

Friday, August 5, 2016

New Foster Care Research from the Casey Foundation


Foster Care Can Spark Modest Improvements in Child Well-Being, New Research Shows

Posted July 1, 2016, By the Annie E. Casey Foundation



For decades, communities have intervened to help children who have been abused and neglected, even without clear data to know which interventions, if any, have worked. According to new research from Kids Insight, a nonprofit grantee of the Casey Foundation, the well-being of many children in foster care  improves while in custody. However, a minority of kids still struggle and agencies need to find innovative approaches to effectively meet their needs.
Kids Insight used the Treatment Outcome Package (TOP) questionnaire, an assessment tool on child well-being, in Colorado, Ohio, North Carolina and Delaware to measure how kids, on average, were doing when they entered care compared to how they were faring at defined points after spending time in care.
“The insights provided by TOP are pretty amazing,” says Tracey Feild, director of Casey's Child Welfare Strategy Group. “While improvements are small, they exist and in many cases are statistically significant.”

Read the entire article HERE.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

Support Groups for Adoptive & Foster Families




"There is a beauty in journeying with other families in the adoption and foster care process. The groups are a place where you can come hurting or joyful, weary or celebrating, and you'll be welcomed and encouraged. I leave our group feeling loved, supported, and heard." - JJ Blandford
 
"I didn't know how desperately I needed to be surrounded by a community who "gets it."
- Support Group Attender

Our support groups provide much-needed support for families so you do not have to walk this journey alone.

New locations include:

 
 Aurora  |  St. Charles  |  West Chicago  |  Wheaton  |  Elgin/Bolingbrook

Already part of a support group, but there is now one closer to you?
Email us and we'll happ
ily switch you! replanted@churchrez.org 

 

 

Support Group Signup

Monday, July 25, 2016

Addressing Secondary Trauma in Foster Parents



Providing care and support for children in the foster care system is challenging work! Secondary traumatic stress is a real condition that occurs when people who did not directly experience the traumatic event empathize and internalize it as if they had. As parents listen to their children’s’ stories and navigate behaviors that are sometimes destructive, it takes an emotional, physical and spiritual toll on foster families and those involved with the families.
As Dr. Rachel Remen described, “The expectation that we can be immersed in suffering and loss daily and not be touched by it is as unrealistic as expecting to be able to walk through water without getting wet.”
There are several indications that one might be experiencing secondary traumatic stress:
 Severe sadness, anger and/or anxiety
  • Feeling isolated and detached from loved ones
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Persistent fatigue
  • Cynicism
  • Physical illness or pain


    Addressing Secondary Trauma

    When you see these indications, there are several ways to address secondary trauma:
  • Connect with Others. Connecting with others is the best way to combat feeling alone and overwhelmed. In addition to professional help, foster/adoptive support groups can be beneficial to validate traumatic experiences. By providing child care or helpful counseling resources Support Team Members can help alleviate barriers to seeking services.
  • Establish Plans For Self-Care. Determine what coping skills and hobbies have been helpful in the past and re-implement them into a daily routine! Support Team Members and respite caregivers can provide activities and care for children in order to promote rest & self-care.
  • Take Parent Out For a Special Day. Plan a day or afternoon with activities that might be a blessing for one of the parents. Perhaps a spa day, hike or fishing trip would provide them a mental and physical break from the pressures of caring for a child. Support Team Members could take turns treating both mom and dad to a day out to spend with caring team members.
  • Meet Them Where They’re At. Families are in need of community that is not focused on cheering them up or expecting them to be “pulled together” all the time. Allowing them to speak honestly allows them to purge the things they cannot express around their children. Encouraging words can be appropriate as long as they do not tell the parent what they “should” be doing differently or minimizing their thoughts or feelings.
  • Pray For Hope. “Sustain me, my God, according to your promise, and I will live; do not let my hopes be dashed.” (Psalm 119:116) Through Christ alone we can have hope in this world because He has overcome and is sufficient when we are lacking.

Resources: